Saturday, February 28, 2015

the beauty of the "clipping mask"

I had a wonderful lesson the other day from a friend. She showed me how to use "clipping mask" in Adobe Illustrator. ! I had this idea a few weeks ago to use scans of my paste papers to create letters. The class I am currently teaching, "The Printed Word," is making a book about one of their initials. I decided it was a good assignment for myself as well. I tried making these letters completely round-about in Adobe Photoshop. And I know, I know, you don't do type in Photoshop. The edges of the letters were completely raggedy - as one would expect. 
Now that I've been shown the right way to do it, I have these beautifully clear letters.
I'm mulling over how to make use of this with my students in the future. Using the paste paper is a great way to have students explore how pattern and texture affect what we are looking. For example the orange t above, looks completely different when the curves in the ascender are not there. What I don't understand is the strange background color. Hm. Maybe that's the next lesson. 

 
I love the blue T. 

And while I've been lesson planning, I came across an assignment online. Students need to design a glyph that does not exist, for a sound that does. I love this idea and gives us a chance to play around with type. I don't consider this one of those glyphs, but I still really like this one:
I like it because it plays with both of my initials. 

2 comments:

renaissance1970 said...

Those paper eggs are beautiful. Nice work. Even the pre egg strips are artwork.

renaissance1970 said...

Those paper eggs are beautiful. Nice work. Even the pre egg strips are artwork.